This family friendly Rainbow Trout recipe is crispy goodness which makes adding more fish into your diet a breeze.  Try our flavorful and crispy rainbow trout as a tasty fish option that is not salmon or tuna!

This rainbow trout recipe for is both tasty, nutritious, and a great addition to an anti-inflammatory meal! Continue reading on to see why you should try and add more fish to your diet if you aren’t now!

Crispy Rainbow Trout

Course: Main Dish
Cuisine: Seafood
Condition: Cancer, Diabetes, Heart Health, Low Sodium, PCOS
Servings: 2 servings

Ingredients

  • 1/2 lb rainbow trout
  • 1/2 lemon juiced
  • 1 tbsp dijon mustard
  • 1 cup breadcrumbs panko
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp paprika
  • pinch cayenne pepper
  • 1 tbsp avocado oil

Instructions

  • Cut trout into 6-inch pieces if necessary. In a small bowl, whisk together lemon juice and dijon mustard. In a shallow dish, combine panko, garlic powder, paprika, and cayenne. Brush top of trout pieces with dijon mixture, then press panko mixture into the fish until well coated.
  • Heat oil in a skillet over medium heat. Place fish in the skillet panko side down and cook until panko is golden brown, about 4-5 minutes. Carefully flip fish and continue to cook until trout is opaque, about 4 more minutes. Serve immediately.

Notes

Recipe adapted from Hello Fresh

Nutrition

Carbohydrates: 25g | Protein: 28g | Fat: 13g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 67mg | Sodium: 341mg | Potassium: 672mg | Fiber: 3g

So, Why Add More Fish to Your Diet?

Before we answer this question, let’s look at how much fish your are currently eating. If you aren’t meeting the minimum recommended amount of two 4-ounce servings or one 8-ounce serving per week, it would be wise to think trying some new fish recipes.

Why is there even a minimum recommended amount? Because eating fish has offers a ton of health benefits that we can’t ignore!

Benefits of Eating More Rainbow Trout

Fish can be a great source of a variety of nutrients, of which can have positive affects when it comes to cardiovascular, brain, and eye health (and more)!

Some of the nutrients found in fish that make it such a great food is the high concentration of omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin D, and high-quality protein, along with a number of other vitamins and minerals.

Several large observational studies showed that those who eat fish regularly had lower risk of strokes and heart attacks from heart disease along with having slower rate of mental decline toward Alzheimer’s.

A leading cause of vision impairment is age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). One study found that women who ate fish regularly had a 42% lower risk of developing ARMD. Not only that, fish is an awesome source of high-quality protein and can be delicious and fairly easy to prepare.

Meeting with a Registered Dietitian

A Registered Dietitian can help guide you to making positive, realistic changes in your diet to help you decrease your risk of chronic conditions and help you manage chronic conditions such as heart disease, Alzheimer’s and more.

-contributions for this blog from Amaris Galik, nutrition intern

-Blog reviewed and updated by Rebecca Bitzer MS RD LD August 30, 2021

Pin It on Pinterest